Mixed Light Sources: Let’s Fix It!

Steven Heller Tutorials 0 Comments

Looking for a quick summary of the following info? Scroll to the bottom for the TL;DR version. When I do my two point lighting setup, working with house lights or ambient light can be tricky. As mentioned in my previous post it can make for a great diffused fill light, but you often run into problems with mixed light color temperatures. I wan’t to avoid getting into the details of lighting temperature too much as many people much smarter than me have already covered this. Suffice it to say, that if you’re not careful, mixing lights with different color temperatures can cause big problems down the line when you’re looking to color correct your finished work. You will likely end up having parts of your frame that are cooler (more blue) or warmer (more yellow) than you would like and they are quite often a PAIN to try and fix. So, instead of being reactive, let’s be proactive and fix the problem before the light even hits the lens. Let’s start off by looking at your lights. I use daylight balanced lights so both the lights in my 2 point setup are the same color. Using matching lights really helps …

Easy 2 Point Interview Lighting

Steven Heller Tutorials 0 Comments

Looking for a quick summary of the following info? Scroll to the bottom for the TL;DR version. When I was learning about interview lighting (as I always still am), I would hear about 3 point lighting all the time. I didn’t often hear about 2 point lighting. Yet, over time as I lit my interviews I found that I gravitated towards two point lighting more and more. Today, I’m going to discuss the lighting setup that I use 90% of the time. Most often, the rooms I shoot in are pretty evenly lit. Sometimes I cut the lights out completely and use just my lights, but if the room is well and evenly lit, I prefer to leave them up and have them act as a fill. A 3 point lighting setup typically consists of a key light (the main light on your subject, set slightly off to one side), a fill light (set to fill in the other side of their face, set at a lower intensity so as to just remove shadows) and an edge, rim, or hair light (these terms are used interchangeably) to add a light from behind which lights up the edge of your subject separating …